Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake

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Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake by WickedGoodKitchen.com ~ Moist, tender white cake reminiscent of its buttermilk cake cousin, Red Velvet Cake, our Champagne Velvet Layer Cake is made with a champagne reduction and a hint of almond and vanilla. It is iced with Pink Champagne Buttercream and filled with Strawberry-Raspberry Filling for a truly romantic dessert experience. Perfect for Valentine’s Day! | dessert recipeA Special Cake for Valentine’s Day:
Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake

Moist, tender white cake reminiscent of its buttermilk cake cousin, Red Velvet Cake, our Champagne Velvet Layer Cake is flavored with a champagne reduction and hints of pure almond and vanilla extracts. It is iced with a billowy and ethereal buttercream frosting, Pink Champagne Buttercream, and accented with a Strawberry-Raspberry Filling that pairs so well with champagne. It’s the perfect celebration layer cake!

Today, I am excited to share yet another velvet layer cake, Champagne Velvet Layer Cake, based on our recipe for White Velvet Layer Cake for Valentine’s Day.

For special occasions, such as birthdays, anniversaries, New Year’s Eve or Saint Valentine’s Day, a spectacular celebration cake makes the day just a bit more special and memorable. Although this lovely cake looks impressive, it is incredibly easy to prepare and decorate. And, the flavor is truly divine. Family, loved ones, friends and guests will surely be enchanted by it.

Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake by WickedGoodKitchen.com ~ Moist, tender white cake reminiscent of its buttermilk cake cousin, Red Velvet Cake, our Champagne Velvet Layer Cake is made with a champagne reduction and a hint of almond and vanilla. It is iced with Pink Champagne Buttercream and filled with Strawberry-Raspberry Filling for a truly romantic dessert experience. Perfect for Valentine’s Day! | dessert recipe

About the Cake

Traditionally, Champagne Cake is a white cake layered with rum, Bavarian or whipped cream as a filling, and iced with pink buttercream frosting—without even a drop of champagne! Imagine that. Nowadays, bakers like adding a splash of bubbly into their cake batters as well as their buttercreams.

For my rendition of champagne cake, Champagne Velvet Layer Cake, I combined buttermilk from traditional Red Velvet Cake for a tender crumb and champagne, actually Santa Margherita Prosecco, from modern champagne cake recipes. However, instead of using the champagne straight, I went for concentrated flavor versus bubbly in a champagne reduction. This decision really paid off for a more intense flavor profile.

Santa Margherita Prosecco

In addition, White Lily® Self-Rising Flour was used as it has impeccably even leavening distribution—because this flour creates velvety smooth cakes without those dreaded holes (due to uneven leavening distribution). Also, White Lily® Self-Rising Flour is made from Southern soft red winter wheat whereas cake flour is made from Northern hard red winter wheat. There are also gluten and protein as well as milling differences, but I am going to leave this food science bit for an upcoming post on flours.

The proper ratio of fats works to create a moist, tender, velvety crumb with no big holes—the ideal velvet layer cake. As many skilled bakers know, whenever you use a little oil in cake batter along with either butter or shortening, it really helps the moisture factor because the oil is liquid at room temperature whereas butter and shortening are not. I definitely wanted to use butter for flavor, a good shortening for keeping the cake white in color and the oil (almond oil) for moisture.

Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake by WickedGoodKitchen.com ~ Moist, tender white cake reminiscent of its buttermilk cake cousin, Red Velvet Cake, our Champagne Velvet Layer Cake is made with a champagne reduction and a hint of almond and vanilla. It is iced with Pink Champagne Buttercream and filled with Strawberry-Raspberry Filling for a truly romantic dessert experience. Perfect for Valentine’s Day! | dessert recipe

Finally, the mixing technique of the Two-Stage Method is used. This method proved to be aces. Although the cake layers have a tight crumb, they are amazingly moist as well as tender, airy and light.

Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake by WickedGoodKitchen.com ~ Moist, tender white cake reminiscent of its buttermilk cake cousin, Red Velvet Cake, our Champagne Velvet Layer Cake is made with a champagne reduction and a hint of almond and vanilla. It is iced with Pink Champagne Buttercream and filled with Strawberry-Raspberry Filling for a truly romantic dessert experience. Perfect for Valentine’s Day! | dessert recipe

About the Buttercream

For those who have never tasted Champagne Buttercream, and as I mentioned in my post for Pink Champagne Buttercream, the taste is similar to cherry or grape flavored buttercream with the distinct and pleasing tang that could only come from champagne or sparkling wine.

In this particular recipe, I used Santa Margherita Prosecco (we always have some on hand) and it did not disappoint. The flavor is sublime. I know that I have said this before, but I could not stop eating this buttercream right from the spoon!

Pink Champagne Buttercream by WickedGoodKitchen.com ~ Made with a champagne reduction, our Pink Champagne Buttercream is creamy, silky, light and melts ethereally on the tongue while not being overly sweet or gritty. It’s the perfect buttercream frosting for special occasion cakes and cupcakes. And, it tastes just like it came from an upscale bakery! All-natural, egg and soy free with a dairy free variation.

Not only does this buttercream whip together in record time, it is an impressive one. It does not have a gritty texture like so many other American Style Buttercreams. This is due to creating a sugar slurry with boiling champagne to dissolve the sugar and an emulsion with the addition of the fats. Furthermore, is not cloyingly sweet since only half the amount of sugar is used when compared with standard American Buttercream recipes. It has a fabulous flavor profile and is silky smooth with a pleasing mouth feel that comes as close to European buttercreams as an American Buttercream can.

ChefMaster® Natural Food Color Paste - Pink

To tint buttercreams, I prefer using all-natural, organic and kosher food coloring pastes by ChefMaster®. I purchase mine from The Baker’s Kitchen as they are a great resource with no minimum orders on these food coloring pastes. (Other stores require you to purchase a box of 12 units…in each color.)

About the Filling

Luscious, velvety smooth, bursting with fresh summer berry flavor, our jewel-like ruby-red homemade Best Ever Strawberry-Raspberry Sauce is simply stunning. Best explained, this sumptuous dessert sauce falls between a fresh but lightly cooked berry coulis and homemade jam. However, it is thick enough to use between cake layers.

Strawberry-Raspberry Sauce {best ever} by WickedGoodKitchen.com ~ Lush, thick, bright ruby-red and bursting with fresh berry flavor, this versatile dessert sauce is easy to prepare, much better than store bought, uses only 4 ingredients and is ready in just 15 minutes! Perfect for spring and summer desserts. #diy #recipe

Using fresh raspberries and strawberries in a 1:1 ratio, only natural sugar and a touch of fresh lemon juice to enhance the flavor, this sauce tastes much better than anything store bought. Plus, our recipe provides plenty of tips making it easy to prepare. Amazingly, after prepping the berries, it is ready in just 15 minutes!

Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake by WickedGoodKitchen.com ~ Moist, tender white cake reminiscent of its buttermilk cake cousin, Red Velvet Cake, our Champagne Velvet Layer Cake is made with a champagne reduction and a hint of almond and vanilla. It is iced with Pink Champagne Buttercream and filled with Strawberry-Raspberry Filling for a truly romantic dessert experience. Perfect for Valentine’s Day! | dessert recipe

There is no doubt that our Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake is both extraordinary and romantic. It is perfect for any special occasion—especially Valentine’s Day.

Bon appétit!

xo,

stacysig

 

 

 

Below are Pinterest-friendly sized images to pin at Pinterest!

Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake by WickedGoodKitchen.com ~ Moist, tender white cake reminiscent of its buttermilk cake cousin, Red Velvet Cake, our Champagne Velvet Layer Cake is made with a champagne reduction and a hint of almond and vanilla. It is iced with Pink Champagne Buttercream and filled with Strawberry-Raspberry Filling for a truly romantic dessert experience. Perfect for Valentine’s Day! | dessert recipe

Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake by WickedGoodKitchen.com ~ Moist, tender white cake reminiscent of its buttermilk cake cousin, Red Velvet Cake, our Champagne Velvet Layer Cake is made with a champagne reduction and a hint of almond and vanilla. It is iced with Pink Champagne Buttercream and filled with Strawberry-Raspberry Filling for a truly romantic dessert experience. Perfect for Valentine’s Day! | dessert recipe

Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake by WickedGoodKitchen.com ~ Moist, tender white cake reminiscent of its buttermilk cake cousin, Red Velvet Cake, our Champagne Velvet Layer Cake is made with a champagne reduction and a hint of almond and vanilla. It is iced with Pink Champagne Buttercream and filled with Strawberry-Raspberry Filling for a truly romantic dessert experience. Perfect for Valentine’s Day! | dessert recipe

 

Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake

Prep Time: 60 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 25 minutes

Yield: Makes one 3-layer, 8-inch layer cake; 10 to 12 servings or 24 to 30 cupcakes.

Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake

Moist, tender white cake reminiscent of its buttermilk cake cousin, Red Velvet Cake, our Champagne Velvet Layer Cake is flavored with a champagne reduction and hints of pure almond and vanilla extracts. It is iced with a billowy and ethereal buttercream frosting, Pink Champagne Buttercream, and accented with a Strawberry-Raspberry Filling that pairs so well with champagne. It’s the perfect celebration layer cake!

Ingredients

  • For the Champagne Reduction
  • 2 cups (480 ml) champagne, pink champagne or sparkling wine, I used Santa Margherita Prosecco
  • For the Champagne Velvet Layer Cake
  • 2½ cups (280 grams) sifted White Lily® Self-Rising Flour
  • 2 cups (400 grams) granulated sugar
  • ½ cup (1 stick/113 grams) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup (48 grams) organic palm shortening, such as Spectrum® brand
  • ¼ cup (56 grams) organic almond oil, or favorite vegetable oil
  • ½ cup (120 ml) champagne reduction
  • ½ cup (120 ml) organic buttermilk, at room temperature
  • ¾ cup (180 grams) egg whites (about 6), at room temperature
  • ½ teaspoon (2.5 ml) pure almond extract
  • ½ teaspoon (2.5 ml) pure vanilla extract
  • Extra flour and shortening to prepare cake pans
  • For the Pink Champagne Buttercream
  • 1 to 1½ recipes Pink Champagne Buttercream, recipe by Wicked Good Kitchen™
  • For the Strawberry-Raspberry Filling
  • 1 recipe Best Ever Strawberry-Raspberry Sauce, recipe by Wicked Good Kitchen™
  • For the Cake Adornments
  • Fresh red raspberries and/or strawberries, optional
  • Fresh mint sprigs, optional
  • Special Equipment
  • Three 8-inch by 1½- to 2-inch round or heart-shaped cake pans
  • Four wire cooling racks, with the fourth being used to flip cake layers right side up
  • One 8-inch cardboard cake round, helpful but not necessary
  • Cake Turntable, such as Ateco®, helpful but not necessary
  • Metal Angled or Offset Icing Spatula, such as Ateco® or Wilton®, helpful but not necessary
  • Metal Icing Spatula, such as Ateco® or Wilton®, helpful but not necessary
  • Wax paper, for lining cake plate for icing, helpful but not necessary
  • Piping bag, coupler and/or decorating tips, necessary for piping

Directions

Prepare the Champagne Reduction: In a medium heavy saucepan over medium-high heat, bring champagne to a boil. Boil until reduced to ½ cup, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat; set aside to cool completely.

Meanwhile, arrange oven rack in lower third of oven and preheat oven to 350ºF. Grease three 8-inch round or heart-shaped cake pans with shortening or oil. Line bottoms with parchment or wax paper cut to fit the size of pans. Grease paper linings and dust lined pans with flour, tapping out the excess. Set aside.

Prepare the Champagne Velvet Layer Cake: Using an electric stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, mix self-rising flour and sugar (or flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt) on low speed (stir) until well combined and aerated, about 1 minute. Add butter, shortening and oil and mix on slow speed until thoroughly combined. Mixture will be very thick.

In a 2-cup glass liquid measuring cup, whisk together champagne reduction, buttermilk, egg whites and extracts using a fork until well blended. Slowly add half of the liquid mixture to the batter and mix on low speed. Increase mixer speed to medium and beat until thoroughly combined, scraping down the sides of bowl as necessary with rubber spatula, about 2 minutes. Add remaining liquid mixture and beat just until smooth and thoroughly combined, again scraping down the sides of bowl as necessary, about 1 minute.

Using rubber spatula, scrape and pour batter into prepared pans dividing evenly (a little over 2 cups of batter per cake pan). Smooth tops evenly with rubber spatula and then rap each pan on counter surface 2 to 3 times to expel any air bubbles. This step will create a nice level cake.

Bake in preheated oven until a toothpick inserted into center comes out clean, about 25 to 30 minutes. (I have found that 28 minutes is perfect.) Cool cakes in pans on wire racks for 10 minutes. Run thin metal spatula around edges of each cake to loosen, then invert onto wire rack and peel away parchment or wax paper. Turn right side up onto wire racks (using an additional rack to flip) and cool completely or wrap while still warm to retain moisture. Wrap each cake layer tightly in plastic food wrap and keep at room temperature until ready to fill and frost.

To Assemble, Frost and Fill the Cake: Use a scant ¾ cup frosting between each layer. After frosting each the bottom and middle layer, pipe a simple ¼-inch border of buttercream around the perimeter of the cake to act as a dam to prevent the filling from going over the edge of the cake layer. Following this, lightly spoon about 4 tablespoons of the Strawberry-Raspberry Filling on top of the buttercream in the center. Using a small angled metal spatula, carefully spread the filling outward to the dam border of buttercream. Carefully place the next cake layer on top and press down gently. Proceed to frost the cake as desired with remaining buttercream.

To Make a Rose Cake with “Rose Swirls”

Use a scant ¾ cup frosting between each layer and then proceed to frost the cake with a “crumb coat” or thin coat, but not too thin. The cake should have good coverage and you should not see the cake peeking through the frosting.

Next, assemble your pastry bag with coupler and tip. (I like to use my Ateco No. 846 tip because it makes gorgeous swirled roses. However, you can also use an open tip like the Wilton 1M.) Fill pastry bag and twist closed. Make sure your hands are not too warm or your buttercream will get too soft. You are now ready to pipe roses!

To pipe roses, start at the bottom and work around the cake to complete a full circle of roses. To pipe each rose, start in the center of where you want your rose to be. Then pipe in a circular fashion counter-clockwise going around the center point once or twice depending on the size of roses you desire. The roses don’t need to be perfect! This is what is so great about piping swirled roses as they look lovely shabby and chic. It is best to end in the same place each time and I like to end at the top right side of each rose.

Once you complete the first row around the cake, continue with the next row and then the top. To fill in any gaps, I like to pipe small stars or flourishes that contour the rose swirls. Rose Cakes are the best. So simple, but so stunning!

To Bake Cupcakes

See specific baking directions and tips in the Notes section at the bottom below recipe.

In general, most cake batters may also be baked in standard paper bake cups in standard 12-cup muffin pans for cupcakes. Usually, a one-layer cake recipe will yield 12 to 15 cupcakes and a two-layer cake recipe will yield 24 to 30 cupcakes. Fill cups at least 2/3 full and bake at 350ºF. until tops spring back when lightly touched, about 15 to 20 minutes. (An exception to this is Wicked Good Kitchen's Carrot Cake recipe, which requires a gentle oven at 325ºF. So, be sure to bake cupcakes at the same temperature as the cake recipe requires.) Rotate pan halfway through baking time for even baking and check for doneness 5 minutes before recommended baking time in recipe. Cool cupcakes in muffin pan on wire rack for 10 minutes. Transfer baked cupcakes to wire racks to cool completely, about 1 hour, before frosting.

Recipe Notes

Tips:

Please note that prep and cook times are for the preparation and baking of the cake. They do not include the time needed to prepare the buttercream (or the component recipe for the filling) or the time for frosting, filling and piping decorations.

In general, prepare as many component recipes in advance for a stress-free day in the kitchen the day you assemble and frost the cake. Read through each of the tips below to determine how to store each component recipe until ready to assemble and frost the cake. I like to prepare each component in advance, with the exception of the buttercream, and then prepare the buttercream the day I assemble and frost the cake. By preparing component recipes in advance, it will assure you have enough time to chill the cake before slicing and serving.

To Make Non-Alcoholic Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake: Simply substitute Sparkling White Grape Juice, such as by St. Julian Winery, for the champagne or sparkling wine and continue with recipe as directed. (Many wineries offer sparkling grape juice, so check with wineries in your area.)

Alternatively, substitute Sparkling Apple Cider, such as by Martinelli's. I highly recommend Martinelli's because their juice is 100% pure juice from fresh apples (not from concentrate) and is certified organic. Use their store locator tool on their site to find a store near you. Also, check with your local Whole Foods Market and specialty markets in your area for Martinelli's sparkling juices.

How to Measure Flour for this Recipe: When measuring flour by volume with measuring cups, sift the flour first onto a sheet of wax paper then spoon flour lightly into cup before leveling off with a thin metal icing spatula or straight edge of a knife. This way, you should obtain approximately 112 grams of flour per cup (the same weight as cake flour) for a total of 280 grams for 2½ cups.

Substitution: White Lily® Bleached All-Purpose Flour may be substituted for White Lily® Self-Rising Flour in the same amount (2½ cups or 280 grams) in this recipe, but you will need to add and sift well into the flour 2 teaspoons (9.6 grams) baking powder, 1 teaspoon (4.8 grams) kosher salt (or ¾ teaspoon regular table salt) and ¾ teaspoon (3.6 grams) baking soda.

How to Bring Eggs to Room Temperature: Should you forget to bring your eggs to room temperature by setting them out for an hour before starting recipe, do not worry. To quickly bring eggs to room temperature, fill a medium bowl with warm tap water—not hot, but warm so the eggs do not cook. Carefully place the eggs into the bowl of water so they are fully submerged. Allow eggs to soak for 10 to 15 minutes. Remove eggs from water and towel dry. Eggs should now be at room temperature and ready to use in recipe.

How To Properly Rap Cake Pans: Hold each pan a few inches above the counter (2 to 3 inches will do) then carefully drop pans flatly onto countertop 2 to 3 times. This step will expel any air bubbles and will ensure nice level baked cake layers.

To Make a Rose Cake: You will need 1½ recipes of Pink Champagne Buttercream, about 6½ cups. This will make just enough to frost, fill, and pipe roses as shown for a 3-layer, 8-inch round cake.

Cake may be made 1 day in advance. Keep wrapped in plastic food wrap at room temperature overnight.

After assembling and frosting the layered cake it is best to chill it until the buttercream is firm, about 30 minutes to 1 hour. Chilling, before slicing the cake, will yield neater cake slices for a better plated presentation.

Store any leftover cake covered in the refrigerator.

To Prepare Cupcakes: Arrange oven rack in lower third of oven and preheat oven to 350º F. Line standard 12-cup muffin pan with standard paper bake cups. Divide batter evenly among 24 muffin cups (baked in two batches), filling each cup 2/3 to 3/4 full. Filling batter two-thirds full will yield more cupcakes with the cupcake batter baked just to the top of each paper bake cup. Filling batter three-quarters full will yield fewer cupcakes with the cupcake batter baked just slightly over the top of each paper bake cup.

Bake cupcakes in preheated oven until tops spring back when lightly touched, about 16 to 18 minutes. Rotate pan halfway through baking time for even baking. Cool cupcakes in muffin pan on wire rack for 10 minutes. Transfer baked cupcakes to wire racks to cool completely, about 1 hour, before frosting. Yield: Makes 24 to 30 cupcakes.

Note: These cupcakes will puff up considerably during baking but then settle down into a level top at the end of baking versus a domed top. Leftover cupcakes can be frozen and stored up to 3 months if wrapped tightly in plastic food wrap and stored in heavy-duty freezer bags. As always, label and date the bag.

Original Recipe Source: WickedGoodKitchen.com

Copyright © Wicked Good Kitchen. All content and images are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without prior permission. If you want to republish this recipe, please re-write the recipe in your own words. Alternatively, link back to this post for the recipe.

http://wickedgoodkitchen.com/pink-champagne-velvet-layer-cake/

About Stacy

Stacy Bryce is a recipe developer and member of the IACP (International Association of Culinary Professionals). Her passion is developing original conventional baking recipes as well as special diet recipes to include dairy-free, gluten-free and grain-free. You can follow Stacy at Pinterest.

Comments

  1. Oh wow what a gorgeous cake! Love the pink color, especially since it comes from fruits 🙂 Strawberry + raspberry with champagne is a perfect combination!

  2. Good Gracious! I think that is the most beautiful cake I have ever seen in my life! Pinned!
    Rachelle recently posted…Butterscotch Martini with Bailey’s Irish Whipped CreamMy Profile

  3. You’ve truly outdone yourself with this cake, simply gorgeous! And that champagne buttercream looks just divine, I don’t think I’d be able to stop myself from a few samples either ;). Hope your weekend is wonderful!
    Laura (Tutti Dolci) recently posted…mocha almond fudge ice creamMy Profile

    • Thank you, Laura! I hope you are having a fabulous weekend, my friend. Saw your luscious ice cream in my feed. I’m coming over right now. 🙂 Thanks for stopping by!

  4. Omg, Stacy! What a STUNNING cake. Like this is beyond beautiful and if I made this creation, I’d be too afraid to dive on in! But who am i kidding?! I LOVE the strawberry-raspberry filling! Such a perfect addition to this layer cake. Yum!!!
    Julie @ Table for Two recently posted…Beyond the TableMy Profile

    • Thank you, Julie! You would love this cake, girl. Thanks for stopping by. By the way…lovely new profile pic! 🙂

  5. Show off!!!!! Lol. Gorgeous!!!! Ever soooooooo romantic. I love the photos. Very special.
    Carol at Wild Goose Tea recently posted…Food For Thought #13My Profile

    • Hahaha! Thanks, Carol! You always make me smile and laugh. Thank you for that and for stopping by. Have a lovely Sunday, my friend, and a great week ahead. 🙂

  6. How pretty! Anyone who made me this on Valentine’s Day would be a keeper 🙂

  7. Dalila G. says:

    WOW!!!!
    What a truly beautiful cake Stacy!!
    Just when I think you can’t top something…..BAM!! You come out with a totally scrumptious, divine creation….again!! 😀
    This is one of the many reason’s I LOVE your blog!!
    I can’t say that mine will come out as pretty, but I am definitely going to give it my best shot.
    Great combination of flavors and of course it looks fabulous!!
    Question ~ sharing is optional, right?! 😉
    Have a great day!
    Pinned!

    • Thank you SO MUCH for the sweet compliments and for the pin, Dalila! You are very kind, my friend. Thank you for stopping by and for always making me smile. 🙂 You are THE BEST. Have a wonderful week!

  8. This is a ‘OMG Cake’. This is by far the most beautiful and romantic cake I’ve seen. Stacy, I never knew about the different flours. I will be making my cake from White Lily flour. As I was reading your post, learnt so much. Your details are always impeccable. The cake has no holes and so perfect. I am speechless.
    This is something I will be making very soon and will be showing off to friends about your blog.
    Have a fabulous week my dear. Your hub is a lucky lucky man.
    xoxo

    • Thank you, Ash! You are very kind to say such sweet things. You have made my day, my friend. 🙂 Have a wonderful week!

  9. I am seriously drooooling!!! A cake that combines all of my favorite things including Champagne – AMAZING!!! I cannot wait to try this recipe – thanks so much for sharing it ~ Cheers:)
    Stephanie Miskew recently posted…The Results of The 8th Annual American Fine Wine Competition!My Profile

  10. Oh Stacy! This is a wonderful cake!! I love how easy and delicate it is.

  11. This is the most gorgeous cake!! Love the use of the prosecco.
    Ashley @ Wishes and Dishes recently posted…Filet Mignon with Truffled Mushroom RagoutMy Profile

  12. Oh my goodness, Stacy! This is such a a STUNNING cake. The rose swirls are perfect and I LOVE the strawberry-raspberry filling! Every single layer looks and sounds incredible! Love the prosecco and I can just imagine how amazing this tastes! Definitely wish I had that slice right there!

  13. So beautiful Stacy!! I absolutely love a pink cake and I knew when you shared that pink champagne icing I’d be making a cake in my near future using it. I’m so glad you did! I have to say I’m a huge fan of White Lily flour.. I order it from Amazon as we don’t get it here in Seattle. This just looks like all kinds of amazing!
    Maria | Pink Patisserie recently posted…Salted Dark Chocolate Pear SconesMy Profile

  14. WOW!! This is beautiful!! Seriously, this is the perfect recipe for Valentine’s Day!! So pretty and pink! 🙂 I would LOVE a slice… how nice those roses are!
    Cailee recently posted…Monday’s Motivation- Cookies!My Profile

  15. This cake is a vision of loveliness — I can’t get over how gorgeous it is! It’s definitely romantic, and who needs roses with this around? 🙂 I love your explanation of using butter, shortening, and oil together — I’d never heard that before. I definitely need to try that palm shortening and the natural food coloring paste. Great tips for a very grand cake, and I love that you used champagne in the cake and the frosting! Unbelievably beautiful my friend, and Happy Valentine’s Day! 🙂
    marcie recently posted…Chocolate Hazelnut MacaronsMy Profile

  16. This cake is absolutely stunning, Stacy!! I love the double filling with jam and frosting! I would love a big piece right now! Pinned!
    Anna @ Crunchy Creamy Sweet recently posted…Peanut Butter Mousse Chocolate CakeMy Profile

  17. I’m so happy you’re back to posting for many reasons, but I’m really happy to have your cakes and buttercream recipes on my screen again. You are the queen of cakes! This looks like such a sweet treat for Vday!
    Pamela @ Brooklyn Farm Girl recently posted…Protein Monday: Quick and Easy Refried Black Beans (from a can!)My Profile

  18. What a gorgeous cake! I love those frosting rose swirls. And that strawberry-raspberry sauce. Oh my!
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  19. This look absolutely beautiful Stacy!! Look georgeous!!
    gloria recently posted…Cherry and amaretto Eton MessMy Profile

  20. Incredible recipe and pictures. Just found you via Pinterest while hunting for White Cake recipes. Absolutely must try this soon!

    • P.S. I live in Europe and we have a pitiful flour selection (all purpose flour is all I can get). Any reccomendations for getting that beautiful white color and the tight crumb? Thank you in advance! <3

      • Oh, dear. I am sorry that you only have access to regular all-purpose wheat flour in Europe. My best recommendation to you if you wish to make this exact cake is to shop via Amazon.com for White Lily brand flours. If you purchase the White Lily Self-Rising Flour, simply follow the recipe directions. However, if you purchase the White Lily All Purpose Bleached Flour, follow the directions in the Notes section of the recipe for that variation which calls for baking powder, baking soda and salt. The problem with substituting regular wheat all-purpose flour for this recipe is that it is too heavy. In addition, the flours are milled differently. When I tested this recipe with regular all-purpose flour using the mixing technique called the Two-Stage Method used in this recipe, my cake fell in the center. If you would like a nice white cake made with regular all-purpose wheat flour and sour cream, I would suggest using the white cake recipe here that I used for my Key Lime Margarita Cheesecake Cake. It stays nice and moist so long as you do not refrigerate it. If you do, the butter will harden. Thank you for writing, Minh. I hope that I have answered your question thoroughly and completely. Meanwhile, best of luck to you and happy white cake baking!

    • Thank you for writing and for the compliments, Minh! This cake makes a wonderful white cake with a tight crumb that is still airy and light. It was based on my recipe for White Velvet Layer Cake which you can follow if not working with a champagne reduction. The secret to the cake’s texture is the type of flour I used by White Lily which is made from soft red winter wheat flour versus hard red winter wheat flour. Thanks again for writing and happy baking!

  21. WOW! Will you be my Valentine & make me this cake?!

  22. Stacy – the texture on this cake is mind blowing – it is so so velvety! And what a fabulous idea to pair it up Strawberry-Raspberry Filling and bring it all together with that incredible Pink Champagne Buttercream! This is fantastic! Exquisite and Totally Mouthwatering! I NEED to be your neighbor!

  23. I am new to the cake baking world and would love to try this cake for Valentines Day- a couple questions. First, can you make the champagne reduction ahead of time and store it in the fridge until ready to make? Also, if making the cupcake version would you then fill them with the raspberry/strawberry mix? Thanks!

    • Hi there, Erin! Thank you for writing. To answer your question… Yes, you can certainly make the champagne reductions (for both the cake and the buttercream) the night before. However, for the buttercream, make a little extra because when you rewarm it to boiling point you may lose some. If you will be making the Strawberry-Raspberry Sauce for a cupcake filling, you may want to cook it down until it is slightly thicker like a jam consistency. Just be careful and keep stirring to prevent scorching or burning. I like to use my silicone spatula for this. The sauce will thicken more once chilled in the refrigerator. The cupcakes bake up demure (small) and have a nice tight crumb, so they should hold the berry filling well. If you wish for a fluffier version of the cupcakes, use the creaming method (cream the fats with the sugar, first) in lieu of the Two-Stage Method where the fats are added to all the dry ingredients. I hope that I have answered your questions thoroughly. Thanks again for stopping by and have fun baking for Valentine’s Day!

  24. This looks like a perfect dessert for Valentine’s Day. I love it!!
    Ella-HomeCookingAdventure recently posted…Chicken, Avocado and Orange SaladMy Profile

  25. What a beautiful cake, Stacy! You are so ready for Valentine’s Day! 😉 You put so much care and effort into your recipes. The pink champagne buttercream looks so thick and pretty! I want to eat all the frosting!
    Julia | JuliasAlbum.com recently posted…Asian Sesame Chicken and NoodlesMy Profile

  26. Stacy, this is stunning!

  27. Good heavens, Stace! This cake is STUNNING!!!! I thought the buttercream all by itself was fantastic and now you have topped it! I am loving the shades of pink and white. And those piped roses are just perfection! Pinned! Gorge.
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  28. This is beautiful! You are the queen of cakes. So glad to hear you are feeling better again- I missed seeing your posts!
    Lori @ RecipeGirl recently posted…Roasted Chicken with Bacon and Sweet PaprikaMy Profile

  29. Thank you very much for this recipe. I just made this wonderful cake and I can’t describe the taste, the texture, everything. I love Pink Champagne Velvet Cake, it’s amazing! Thank you for sharing the recipe!

    • Thank you, Simona! My pleasure. I’m so glad you enjoyed this recipe. Thanks for stopping by. I hope you had a nice Valentine’s Day!

  30. Wow, this cake is simply stunning! I am so glad to see that you are back and bringing us all of these delicious recipes!
    Ashley | Spoonful of Flavor recently posted…Stitch Fix Review February 2015My Profile

  31. Wow!! All the layers of the cake look so delicious and come together beautifully! Thank you for the helpful tips; I’m definitely saving this recipe for a special occasion (:
    Monica recently posted…Baci di DamaMy Profile

  32. Hubba, hubba! This is one sexy cake – like lingerie for the dessert world! Positively breathtaking! And that champagne buttercream sounds divine.
    Hayley @ The Domestic Rebel recently posted…XXL Brown Butter Vanilla Bean Chocolate Chunk CookiesMy Profile

    • LOL! I love it…like, lingerie for the dessert world! I love ya, girl. Thanks for stopping by and have a fabulous Friday and weekend! xo

  33. I’m in love! I should have known you were going to knock out a gorgeous dessert with this fabulous buttercream! You’re not only back, YOU are back, girl! Stunning!
    Meghan recently posted…Goat Cheese Cheesecake Pretzel BitesMy Profile

  34. This is the most gorgeous layered cake we have seen hands down….so pretty and beautiful.The way you have cleanly sliced it…the layers look distinct and yummy…we imagined and wished we could have a good slice from the screen.Stacy,you just proved it again…homemade goodies and treats are way beyond store bought ones…they are perfect,full with love and enthusiasm for the family and oh so dreamy delicious in taste…thanks so much…Have A Beautiful Day! 🙂
    Kumar’s Kitchen recently posted…Mushroom,Green Peas & Spring Onion Pulav 🙂My Profile

  35. This is so beautiful!!! The perfect layers, the champagne…love it! Pinned 🙂
    Aimee @ ShugarySweets recently posted…Mint Chocolate Chip Brownie BitesMy Profile

    • Thank you for the kind comments and pin, Aimee! It’s always a great day when you drop by. 🙂 Have a wonderful weekend, my friend!

  36. hi, I don’t drink or use alcohol in cooking or baking so I’m just wondering if there is something else that could be used instead of the champagne?

    • Hi there, Nova!

      Thank you for writing with such a great question.

      To Make Non-Alcoholic Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake: Simply substitute Sparkling White Grape Juice, such as by St. Julian Winery, for the champagne or sparkling wine and continue with recipe as directed. (Many wineries offer sparkling grape juice, so check with wineries in your area.)

      Alternatively, substitute Sparkling Apple Cider, such as by Martinelli’s. I highly recommend Martinelli’s because their juice is 100% pure juice from fresh apples (not from concentrate) and is certified organic. Use their store locator tool on their site to find a store near you. Also, check with your local Whole Foods Market and specialty markets in your area for Martinelli’s sparkling juices.

      Once again, Nova, thank you for asking such an excellent question. I have updated both recipes, Pink Champagne Buttercream and Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake, with my recommendations.

      Meanwhile, I hope that I have answered your question thoroughly and completely.

      Happy baking!

      ~Stacy

  37. Hi Stacy do you think I can make this beautiful recipe with gluten free flour I use pillsbury gluten free

    • Hi there Maritza! Thank you for writing with such a great question. Since I have not tested this recipe using Pillsbury gluten free flour, or any other brand of gluten free flour blend, I cannot recommend it. Because most gluten free flour blends contain rice flour, which is heavy, it can affect the rise and sink your layer cakes. However, if you feel like testing the recipe in the kitchen go ahead and see how the Pillsbury gluten free flour blend performs in layer cakes. Good luck and let me know how it goes!

  38. LOVE your beautiful cakes. I’d like to know if you have tried reversing the colors on the cake — pink cake with white frosting, using the strawberry-raspberry syrup in the cake. If you try it out, let us know

  39. Made this cake today. It has to be the best cake I ever made. Thank you for the recipe

    • Thank you, Nat! My pleasure. I greatly appreciate you taking the time to drop by and share your experience with my recipe for Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake. There are many more cake and buttercream recipes to come with my Layer Cake Series and ongoing Buttercream Series. I hope you will drop by to check them out over the coming months. Thanks again for stopping by and for your readership. Happy baking! 🙂

  40. I am going to be very honest here. I am not a beginner baker and I drooled over this cake for 2 months. Finally went and bought all the ingredients which were NOT cheap. Spent 5 1/2 hours in the kitchen with a ton of dirty dishes to make a disaster of a cake!
    I never mind work or dishes or even cost for that matter if the cake at least turns out ok. This however was horrible! Cake was flat and I followed the recipe using measurements not cups as it usually the most accurate. The sauce was mediocre and the icing OMG tasted awful.
    On top of everything the cake when putting the layer of sauce with the loose icing (btw I used an entire bag of confectioner sugar not just 480g or 4 cups) ! Was sliding off the dish! I had to secure it with a dozen toothpicks!! I have never spent so much time to end up with such a terrible cake and a wasted of expensive ingredients!
    I do not see how anyone was able to make this cake look like the one posted. I would love to see this entire recipe in Allrecipes or Food Network and the rating it would get there. I’m sure the results would be the same as mine! What a shame!

    • Thank you for taking the time to write, Carol!

      It’s always a great day when I hear from my readers. However, like you, I am going to be completely honest. In fact, brutally honest because that’s how I roll.

      First, I am sincerely sorry to hear that you experienced trouble with this recipe. Please know that ALL of my recipes are professionally tested to include metric measurements by weight. By “professionally tested”, I mean at least three (3) times with the last test being as written. This is what the term “professionally tested” constitutes and how it is recognized throughout the culinary industry.

      Second, this recipe is tested, tried and true by my readers. In fact, several have expressed that the cake, White Velvet Layer Cake, is the best white cake they have ever baked—including comments from the same cake recipe featured on the blog for White Velvet Layer Cake with Strawberry-Raspberry Mascarpone Buttercream. It was inspired by the white cake developed by Cook’s Illustrated as well as my grandmother’s recipe for Lane Cake.

      But, to each his own. Perhaps you do not like light and tender moist white cake with a tight crumb, which is the true and first definition of a “velvet” cake? This cake was developed and designed as a small 3-layer cake to omit the step of “torting”, which means slicing cake layers horizontally, that can scare many young or new bakers away. This is why the layers are not very tall for this 8-inch diameter cake. If they were taller, the cake overall would be too tall and have too much surface area to accommodate the buttercream recipe.

      This is what I stated in my article accompanying the White Velvet Layer Cake with Strawberry-Raspberry Mascarpone Buttercream recipe:

      “The reason for only 2 cups of batter per cake pan, and going with three (3) 8-inch round cake pans, was to create an easy recipe for an attractive multi-layered cake whilst eliminating the step of “torting” the cake layers by slicing them horizontally. Again, I wanted an easy no-fuss recipe for Georgia since she will be a new and very busy mom.”

      Third, you deviated from the buttercream recipe—hence, changed it. Thank you for being honest and sharing this important aspect of your experience when making this recipe because it has given me great insight as to how to troubleshoot your difficulties and isolate the problem.

      Although you state that you are not a beginner baker, I do not think you are a seasoned or very experienced baker. Most experienced bakers have learned (the hard way) that adding more confectioners’ or “powdered” sugar to buttercreams will just cause them to break down and become too “loose” and impossible to work with, versus thicken as they theorized, as the fat ratio is greatly decreased while the sugar content is increased—in your case, significantly increased because you stated that you “used an entire bag of confectioner sugar”.

      Well, there is your problem.

      Now, allow me to share a little bit of food science with you which should have you understanding exactly why your attempt at my recipe for buttercream, Pink Champagne Buttercream, using the “sugar slurry and emulsification technique”, failed.

      By the way, there are a total of five (5) recipes for buttercream here on the blog that use the same “sugar slurry and emulsification technique” starting with the tutorial for Best Ever American Buttercream. All have stellar reader reviews. Here they are (with two more coming soon to the blog):

      Best Ever American Buttercream {a tutorial}
      Best Ever Baileys® Irish Cream Buttercream
      Chocolate Fudge Silk Buttercream
      Pink Champagne Buttercream
      Raspberry and Strawberry Silk Buttercream

      Since sugar is hygroscopic and you stated that you “used the entire bag of confectioners’ sugar”, doing simple math has me calculating that you used a large 2-pound bag of confectioners’ sugar at 908 grams instead of the 480 grams (4 cups at 120 grams each) called for in the recipe which is slightly over a 1-pound box at 454 grams. That’s nearly double!

      No wonder you stated about the buttercream, “…the icing OMG tasted awful.”

      If you look up the term “hygroscopic” at Wikipedia, you will learn the following:

      Hygroscopic substances include cellulose fibers (such as cotton and paper), sugar, caramel, honey, glycerol, ethanol, methanol, sulfuric acid, many fertilizer chemicals, many salts (including table salt), and a wide variety of other substances.”

      Sugar is hygroscopic.

      Have you ever made homemade caramel sauce, like our recipe for Homemade Salted Caramel Sauce? Sugar, when heated, melts into liquid. This occurs, without adding any liquid to it and illustrates the point I am making on hygroscopy.

      No wonder your cake layers were slipping and sliding with your cake and you “had to secure it with a dozen toothpicks!!” 😉

      Once you learn the properties of baking ingredients, and how they react together, you will become a better and truly experienced baker.

      The recipes for my red berry sauces, such as Raspberry Sauce, Strawberry Sauce and Strawberry-Raspberry Sauce, are not mediocre. I beg to differ as it is my opinion that your anger over your recipe fail has clouded your judgment. Although the recipes are my own, they were inspired by one of Rose Levy Beranbaum’s recipes found in her legendary cookbook, The Cake Bible, which won an IACP (International Association of Culinary Professionals) award and has been recognized by the James Beard Foundation as one of the top 13 baking books on “the Essential Book List.”

      The cost of ingredients, expending time in the kitchen and having to clean “a ton” of dirty dishes is all a part of baking, learning and growing as a baker, Carol. We have all been there and done that. 🙂

      Now, I hope that you can “see how anyone was able to make this cake look like the one posted” is indeed possible by following the recipe, including the tips, as written. This means without deviating and making wild and significant changes.

      Carol, I would “love to see this entire recipe in Allrecipes or Food Network and the rating it would get there” as well. I guarantee you…if the readers followed the recipe as written, without major changes, the results would not be the same as yours.

      You mentioned, “What a shame!”

      Well, Carol, in all honesty the real “shame” is that people try to change recipes (without a solid understanding of the properties of ingredients) and then place blame on the authors and recipe developers for their own culinary failures. That’s brutal truth speaking, not arrogance. There is a difference between confidence and arrogance and I am confident in my recipes because they have been tested thoroughly and professionally. In fact, I always write them with plenty of “visual cues” in the Preparation section (directions) and there are always plenty of tips, variations and sources for ingredients found in the Notes section of my recipes here at Wicked Good Kitchen. The truth is, I want my readers to be successful in their kitchens when preparing my recipes and to enjoy the fruits of their labor.

      Once again, thank you for sharing your comments on your experience with this recipe. However, I sincerely hope that I have been helpful to you in pointing out your mistake so that you don’t go through the expense of time and cost of ingredients when attempting other buttercream recipes in the future and that you will have many successes. 🙂

      Meanwhile, happy baking and buttercream making!

      ~Stacy

      P.S. Here is a link to a beautifully executed cake, Pink Champagne Velvet Cake, by food blogger Simona Callas, using the Rose Swirl technique and Wicked Good Kitchen’s recipes for Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake and Pink Champagne Buttercream.

      • Thank you Stacy for not just deleting my very negative review.
        I am a very experienced baker and the only reason I added the entire bag of Confection Sugar was because when followed exactly as written it was not even thick enough to put on the cake let alone pipe it on and I needed to finish the icing it rather than begin again which was a mistake on my part. I should have just trashed the icing and use a different recipe. I did not know the science however behind the making of buttercream icing and for that I thank you, which I’m sure many of an experienced baker would not know either.
        I have, just so you know made many wonderful cakes, pastries , breads, etc ( you can ask my friends and family as they all call me Martha, LOL) and have a wonderful recipe for Buttercream icing that tastes great and is very firm without any shortening in it. I however am always game to try new things and thus why I attempted this recipe.
        As far as measurements go I did notice that when I weighed out the palm shortening it was much more than 1 cup by weight and the egg whites were 5 rather than 6 and the Veggie oil came to almost 1/3 of a cup by weigh over the 1/4 cup in measurements so maybe I should have used US measurements rather than weight.
        As far as the cake goes it was fine except that the batter did not in fact produce 2 cups of batter for each pan and therefore made much thinner cakes which turned out tasted fine just not as tall as yours. I usually just bake cakes in two pans and cut them if I want more layers.
        I found that the filling was just ok because it was too sour and not thick enough which has very much to do with the berries themselves and how it is cooked. If I were to attempt this cake again I would make more of a jam out of the berries rather than a sauce so it would better hold onto the cake layers.
        I happen to get very frustrated like you do when people change a recipe with recipes that do not work and might I share that is much much more common than you would think. Like I said above I never mind the time, mess and cost of ingredients if in fact the end result is wonderful. I congratulate you on your success with this and your other recipes I was just unable to recreate them in my kitchen.

  41. ScuttledCuttle says:

    I don’t often leave comments on recipes, but this one is so phenomenal I just had to take the time to do so. I love to bake scratch cakes, and have a great reputation at work for my baking, but this was my first triple layer cake (I’m terrible at decorating, so I usually try to keep it simple). I was very glad I made the sauce a day ahead and didn’t skimp on using quality ingredients, because this was one of the best cakes I’ve ever eaten. The mingled flavors are just perfection. I made it for a coworkers birthday, as she loves raspberries and prosecco, and she declared it the best cake she’d eaten in her life. It didn’t last long!

    I can definitely see this cake recipe as a versatile base for all sorts of layer cakes and flavor combinations. I tried a half recipe as well, to make one 8 inch layer and some cupcakes as an experiment, and all of them turned out perfectly. I also tried using some pear cider as the sparkling component – also wonderful! Thank you so much for this terrific recipe, not to mention all the other tempting things I’ve bookmarked on your blog now.

    • Thank you! I greatly appreciate your positive feedback and comments on this fabulous recipe for Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake and am thrilled that everyone enjoyed your cake! Happy baking! 🙂 ~Stacy

  42. Elizabeth says:

    Oh my word this looks fantastic! I loved reading your, clearly extensive, food science knowledge. I live in Denver and struggle with every new recipe In regards to making it work at this altitude. Some recipes are easier than others, but cakes are usually the most fickle. When I make as written, they usually bubble up and over into my oven, then sink in and get hard and crunchy around the outside. I have decent luck halving the leavening ingredients, but they still don’t come out as flawlessly as other reviewers. I can’t wait to try this one out and am going to be patient and wait until I get all the recommended ingredients you have listed, in order to ensure the best luck. In the meantime, do you have advice on how to make this cake work out here? Thank you so much for your feedback!

    • Hi there, Elizabeth! Thank you for writing with such kind comments and a great question. This recipe for Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake just might be a good one to test for high altitude baking because the egg whites are not beaten separately incorporating air because angel food cakes made in the same way tend to flow over and collapse when baked at high altitudes. Since this recipe calls for whisking the egg whites in the buttermilk (which would not incorporate too much air), you just might have success. 🙂 In addition to decreasing the amount of leavening, you may want to increase your oven baking temperature a tad (say, about 25 degrees) so that the cake has a chance to “set” or bake a bit more quickly with the hope being the cake will not have a chance to rise too quickly then collapse in the center. Meanwhile, here is a helpful link to baking at high altitude specifically for cakes at Allrecipes.com: High Altitude Cake Baking. Thanks again for writing, Elizabeth. I hope that I have answered your question thoroughly and completely. Meanwhile, let me know how things go. Good luck and happy baking! ~Stacy

      • Elizabeth says:

        Thank you so much for your response! I’ll definitely give all your recommendations a go. I’ll keep you updated!

  43. Elisha Chamberlin says:

    Can you add sour cream to the cake as well?

    • Elisha Chamberlin says:

      I forgot to mention that I made this cake last night and it was so delicious but it ended up sinking in the middle so I am not sure what I did wrong.

      • Hi again, Elisha!

        It’s always disappointing when a project doesn’t go as planned or when a cake doesn’t bake up as we had hoped. I’m so sorry this happened.

        To answer your question, there are several reasons why a cake may fall in the center after baking.

        Here is my Top 10 List of Reasons Why Cakes Fall:

        1. Ingredients Not at Room Temperature – Cake batters love room temperature ingredients – not cold ingredients. And they love warm ovens for baking and room temperature for proper cooling. These measures are taken to create a proper emulsion of the ingredients. So, be sure to bring all ingredients to room temperature, like butter, eggs and milk, before starting a cake recipe unless instructed to do otherwise.
        2. Wrong Flour Used and Not Sifted – If the correct flour called for in the recipe was not used, and it was not sifted properly, the cake may sink. I tested this recipe using sifted regular cake flour (made from hard winter wheat) before settling on White Lily® (made from soft winter wheat and even milled differently than cake flour) for a nice even “velvet” crumb. Always use the proper flour called for in cake recipes and sift.
        3. Baking Powder Too Old or Not Sifted into Flour Properly – If you used your own leavening in the recipe (see variation in the Notes section), it could be out of date. If self-rising flour was used, the same could be true – that the leavening in the flour expired. When using your own leavening and flour, versus self-rising flour, always sift at least 3 times for an evenly baked cake that will not fall. Take a moment to test your baking powder’s effectiveness before baking, if unsure. To do so, place a teaspoon of baking powder in ½ cup of hot water. If it is still effective, you will see a rapid bubble. If not, it is time to replace your baking powder. If using self-rising flour, be sure to check the expiration date.
        4. Too Much Leavening – When too much leavening is used, the chemical reaction can cause a cake to rise too rapidly by adding too much air for the cake’s structure (proteins) to support.
        5. Overbeating or Improper Mixing of the Batter – This is the most common problem all bakers face – both new and experienced. If the batter is overbeaten, beyond what the recipe calls for to create a proper emulsion of the ingredients, too much air is incorporated for the cake’s structure (proteins) to support. Although mechanical and not chemical, the cause and result is the same as reason No. 4 above – too much air. The proper mixing of cake batter is important as well – from scraping down the bowl often to not adding ingredients too quickly. Always gradually add wet and dry ingredients.
        6. Improper Oven Temperature – A calibrated oven and proper preheating are both important. If the oven temperature runs too hot or too cold, both can cause a cake to fall before it has time to bake evenly and its structure to “set”.
        7. Opening Oven Door During Baking – Opening the oven door too early during baking “to check the cake” can cause a cake to fall due to the cool draft that drops the oven temperature before a cake has a chance to bake long enough for its structure to “set”.
        8. Poor Timing Before Baking – If finished cake batter sits out too long before being poured into cake pans, or the filled cake pans with batter sit out too long before being placed into the preheated oven, this added time before baking weakens the chemical reaction of the leavening agents causing the cake to fall.
        9. Poor Timing During Baking – If a cake is not baked fully nor has a chance to “set” structurally, essentially the cake is under-baked and will collapse in the center. Be sure to test for doneness, as indicated in recipe, before removing from oven.
        10. Improper Cooling – If the hot cakes from the oven are placed in a cool environment, or near a cool draft, the cakes will fall before having a chance to cool slowly and “set” structurally.

        Thanks again for writing, Elisha. I hope that I have answered your question thoroughly and completely. 🙂

        Meanwhile, good luck and happy cake baking!

        ~Stacy

        • Elisha Chamberlin says:

          Thank you for responding. I made the cake again last night and they still sunk. I am using White Lilly Self-Rising Flour. The night before I sifted and then mixed it as directed for one minute. All of the ingredients that required to be at room temperature were room temperature. I might have opened up the oven the night before, but I did not do that last night so that leads me to believe it is an issue with the temperature in the oven. I have not had this problem before with other scratch cakes but I will keep trying. I wonder if I should raise or lower the oven temperature?? Just a thought. The cake still tastes great. I will have to use a little more icing to make it level. 🙂

    • Hi there, Elisha! Thank you for writing. To answer your question, I am sure you could incorporate sour cream into the recipe. However, that would be an entirely different recipe. You would have to substitute it with the buttermilk and then add some whole milk. If you do try this, let me know how it goes! 🙂

  44. Noreen Abel says:

    Wow, my kitchen smells amazing, all components are made. I was so intrigued by your buttercream method. Logic told me the dissolving of the icing sugar would make for a creamier frosting. I am not a huge fan of the classic American style buttercream but use it for piping of flowers on cakes that I fill and frost with Swiss, French or Italian style buttercreams. This sits well in the middle and I agree I could just sit and eat it off the spoon.
    I have yet to pipe with it but the consistency tells me it will work beautifully. I also generally do not use shortening so I wonder can this be done with all butter? I would think it could but I don,t want to play around with your recipe unnecessarily.
    It is Mother’s Day here in Aust and I usually bake for everyone but me, so my treat was to make your cake for myself. Just wish my filling will cool down I am itching to put it together.

    • Noreen Abel says:

      Just an add on to my first post. My cake turned out amazing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
      Two days later I took left over to work ( only hubby and me at home so way too much for two lol.)
      Never heard so many OMG responses about frosting before and the cake in general.
      A definite keeper and looking forward to trying many more of your recipes.
      Thank You.
      Noreen from Australia.

      • Thank you for writing, Noreen! I am beyond thrilled that everyone you served this special cake, Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake, enjoyed it. You made me smile by sharing all the OMG responses to the frosting recipe for Pink Champagne Buttercream. 🙂 It is one of my all-time favorite buttercream frostings. Thank you for your readership and continued support. It means so much! Meanwhile, I hope you will stay tuned. Upcoming on the blog is the most wonderful Fresh Strawberry Pie with Buttermilk Pie Crust made with an irresistible and all-natural homemade berry glaze and an innovative and original recipe (I believe, never published before) Stabilized Whipped Cream with a simple secret ingredient. It’s to die for! The taste is amazing and it holds up well (for days, refrigerated) with absolutely NO weeping or puddling. Thanks again for writing and happy baking! ~Stacy

    • Hi there, Noreen! Thank you for writing with such a great question. 🙂 I have not tested this recipe with all butter as it was designed to create an emulsion with the champagne reduction using palm shortening – a healthy, pure and natural 100% fat that is made sustainably and performs well in recipes from mouth feel to taste. If I were to test this recipe using all butter, however, I would definitely decrease the amount of liquid to compensate for the liquid (milk) in the butter. Even then, the buttercream would not hold up as well in warm kitchens and warm spring and summer days outdoors, or pipe beautiful details, as butter is very soft at room temperature while palm shortening is firm. Thanks again for writing and I hope that I have answered your question thoroughly and completely. I am glad to know that you made this special cake, Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake, for yourself in celebration of Mother’s Day. 🙂 Such a delightful treat for yourself and to share with others!

      • Noreen Abel says:

        Hi Hun, I have been asked to make your cake and buttercream for a lovely lady who was the most ardent of fans when she got to try some at my work place the rub is she wants me to do a fondant covered cake , an amazing design , I know I will need to ganache the cake do you think it would be an OK combo your cake as it is with white chocolate ganache coating and then fondant. Value your opinion.
        Noreen

  45. Just about to try out this recipe for my granddaughter’s baptism cake, it looks great. Wondering if hi-ratio shortening could be used in place of palm shortening?

    • Hi there, Tessie! Thank you for writing with such a great question. If I am understanding correctly, you are asking if hi-ratio shortening could be used in place of the palm shortening for the buttercream, Pink Champagne Buttercream, that is used to frost this cake. If so, the answer to your question is yes. However, I am not a fan of hi-ratio shortening due to the additives and I express my strong opinion in my tutorial post for Best Ever American Buttercream on which this buttercream recipe is based. However, if you are asking if hi-ratio shortening can be used in place of the palm shortening called for in the cake portion of the recipe for the White Velvet Layer Cake, my answer is that I cannot recommend this substitution as I have not tested it. You can certainly do a trial run, and see how the cake recipe turns out using hi-ratio shortening, before creating the cake for the special occasion baptism cake for our granddaughter. Thanks again for writing, Tessie. I hope that I have answered your question thoroughly and completely. Have a wonderful celebration! And happy baking and buttercream making! 🙂

  46. OMG, I made this for New Year’s Eve 2016. Amazing!!! We are not big fans of icing of any kind because of the sweetness– so a little went a long way. But i may start using the layer cake recipe as a go to recipe for different variations. Thanks so much!

    • Thank you, Leena! My pleasure. I am thrilled to know that you and others enjoyed this recipe for Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake. Thanks for dropping by and for sharing your experience with this recipe. Best wishes to you in the New Year! 🙂

Trackbacks

  1. […] English version go to Wicked Good Kitchen De când am văzut la Stacy acest tort, mi-a rămas gândul la el. Nu am utilizat până acum […]

  2. […] Moist, tender white cake reminiscent of its buttermilk cake cousin, Red Velvet Cake, this one is flavoured with a champagne reduction and hints of pure almond and vanilla extracts. It is iced with a billowy and ethereal buttercream frosting, pink champagne buttercream, and accented with a Strawberry-Raspberry Filling that pairs so well with champagne. It s the prefect celebration layer cake! Get recipe here […]

  3. […] Pink Champagne Velvet Layer Cake […]

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