Mom’s Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling

Follow Me on Pinterest

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie FillingTart Cherry Pie Filling: A Retro Recipe – Revamped

Last weekend, The Big Lug and I went tart cherry picking about 30 minutes from where we live, at Stuckey Farm, in Sheridan, Indiana, and brought home some serious summertime cherry loot. Little red orbs suddenly took over our kitchen. And, soon, I got busy pitting and transforming them into a magical yet super simple tart cherry pie filling—that is, Mom’s Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling.

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 2

Mom’s recipe was found printed in the newspaper and soon became a “clipping” kept in her Better Homes & Gardens cookbook. This is how women found “free recipes” back then and many were jewels that became family favorites for years. Her original recipe for the Best Cherry Pie called for 3½ cups fresh or canned tart cherries. I imagine the recipe writer called for nearly 4 cups of either fresh or canned cherries not only to fill a 9-inch pastry-lined pie pan, but also because it would be easy for women to purchase two 16-ounce cans of red sour pitted cherries to make the pie off-season or if tart cherries were  unavailable locally when in season.

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 4

However, my mom scaled her recipe to yield enough filling to bake deep-dish style in her deep 9-inch pie plate or in her regular 10-inch pie plate and increased the cherries to 5 cups. (I have since added an additional cup bringing it to a whopping 6 cups! But, you can use 5 cups, if you’d like.) Her vintage recipe is unique in that it does not call for water. Instead, it calls for cherry juice. This is pure genius as the filling is made with all cherries…the fruit and the juices.

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 5

Mom would let her cherries sit in a large bowl after pitting them and let the juices flow, about 20 minutes or so, despite the recipe not instructing to do so. She would do this while she gathered the rest of her ingredients. Do not be like me and get caught up doing other things (like getting lost at Pinterest!) and allow your cherries to darken at the stem end after pitting them. Work quickly and watch them closely as they turn dark…fast!

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 6

If you do not wish to wait for the natural cherry juices to emerge, and wish to work quickly and leave the juices intact for a juicier filling, use 100% Organic Tart Cherry Juice not made from concentrate. I highly recommend Eden Foods® brand as their juice is organic, comes from Michigan Montmorency cherries and contains 17 antioxidants. I buy mine from my local Whole Foods Market.

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 7

As with my Very Berry Strawberry Cobbler recipe, I like using a fruit’s own juices whenever possible. And, sometimes, like with my recipe for Cherry Berry Sundae Sauce with Red Wine, I like adding Tormaresca Neprica (Italy), an Italian red with a strong berry flavor profile. Quoting myself here from that recipe, “I mean, why add all that water (some recipes call for 1 to 1½ cups of water, yikes!) which just makes the strawberries swim in a flavorless, often overly sweet, especially runny and not very bright red syrup? Yuck. Adding all that water is just plain wrong.” Exactly. The same goes for our recipe for Mom’s Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling.

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 8

Mom’s vintage recipe called for flour as a thickening agent, 1 tablespoon of butter and ½ teaspoon almond extract as well as a few drops of red food coloring. The recipe called for the butter to be stirred into the filling. Sometimes I leave the butter in and sometimes I leave it out. (If you’d like to add butter, add 1 tablespoon of unsalted butter to this recipe. The same goes for the red food coloring, if you’d like to add it, add a few drops when you add the almond extract. But, you don’t really need it to create a beautiful red color. It just happens naturally with the help of the cherry juice.) Of course, I enjoy tweaking recipes to improve them and call for tapioca flour in my recipe versus regular all-purpose wheat flour.

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 9

Yes, tapioca flour (also known as tapioca starch). Imagine, no more tapioca pearls to whack with a rolling pin or ground tapioca to try to pulverize into powder form in a food processor. Here’s a remark from a discouraged reader of Annie’s Eats commenting on Annie’s lovely Sweet Cherry Pie recipe but sharing her frustrations over tapioca:

Sarah: “I won’t be grinding my tapioca, either. I tried in both my food processor and with the mortar and pestle and it was just too hard!”

Exactly (again). I used to feel the same way. Once I started baking gluten-free recipes a couple years ago, I was introduced to tapioca flour. And, guess what? It is a dream to use when thickening fruit and their juices for cobblers and crisps as well as pies and tarts. Hooray!

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 10

In the same post, I extolled all the virtues of using tapioca flour versus flour or cornstarch in my recipe for Very Berry Strawberry Cobbler:

“My second secret is using tapioca starch to thicken the strawberry filling. Tapioca is superior to cornstarch and flour when thickening delicate berries with plenty of juice but not much naturally occurring pectin. Unlike blueberries, strawberries and their juices need a little extra help. Using flour to thicken the especially light juices of strawberries greatly overpowers the flavor and the result is a “gluey” filling. Not good. However, tapioca creates thickened juices that are clear, bright and glossy in appearance as well as maintains the fresh berry flavor. To read more about thickening agents used in pies and cobblers, visit Cook’s Illustrated for the article, How to Thicken Fruit Pies, from July 1, 1995.”

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 11

Once again, the same goes for Mom’s Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling. Tapioca flour is the way to go for a beautiful glossy red filling with just the right amount of thickness. Easy peasy.

Honest to goodness, this pie filling is incredibly tasty (I couldn’t stop eating it from the spoon!) and easy to prepare. Do not be intimidated. I mean, just look at how short the recipe is. The most difficult or time consuming aspect is pitting the cherries. It only took me 25 minutes to rinse, dry and pit all of mine using this inexpensive gizmo (read: awesome cherry pitter) and with virtually no mess at all. As you will see in the visual step-by-step photos below, I set up my pitting station over a half baking sheet pan lined with absorbent paper towel. This little system works like a dream to keep splatter nearly non-existent.

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 12

Of all the cherry pitters I have ever owned, this one is the best and cost the least. Forget those single pitters! One look at Deb over at Smitten Kitchen making her Sweet Cherry Pie will sell you on this little beauty. It captures all the excess juice in the attached bottom tray to keep cherry juice splatter to a minimum versus looking like a murder scene in your kitchen. Plus, did I say this little gizmo is easy to use versus hurting your hand to clamp down on a single cherry at a time? Yep. It pits 4 cherries at a time, too. And, it is a breeze to clean. (No, at this time I am not an Amazon.com affiliate. I just like to share information with my readers about my favorite and recommended kitchen gadgetry.)

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 13

Nothing says summer like fresh tart cherry pie filling in a fresh, home-baked pie. And, as I shared with you yesterday, Rose Levy Beranbaum once wrote, “There is something about sour cherries. Their tart flavor is as pure and joyful as the piercingly clear song of a cardinal.” Rose is right. Isn’t she always?

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 14

Meanwhile, I hope you will enjoy my “retro recipe revamped” for Mom’s Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling! It truly is the very best and offers so many applications. Later this week, I will be featuring recipes incorporating it. I cannot wait to share!

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 15

What makes Mom’s Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling wicked good? A sumptuous homemade cherry pie filling made with plenty of fresh picked tart “Meteor” cherries (6 cups!) as well as just the right amount of sugar for sweetness and fresh cherry juice for tartness makes our cherry pie filling stand out from the pack. By using tapioca starch as a thickener, versus flour as in the original vintage recipe, or cornstarch, the fresh cherry flavor bursts through the filling instead of being overpowered resulting in a clear and bright look and taste versus lackluster. What’s not to love?

Bon appétit!

xo,

spatsign

 

 

 

Follow on Bloglovin

♥ Follow Me On Bloglovin’!

Mom’s Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 5 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes

Yield: Makes enough filling for one 9- or 10-inch pie, about 2½ pints or just over 1 quart.

Mom’s Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling

What makes Mom’s Homemade Cherry Pie Filling wicked good? A sumptuous homemade cherry pie filling made with plenty of fresh picked tart “Meteor” cherries (6 cups!) as well as just the right amount of sugar for sweetness and fresh cherry juice for tartness makes our cherry pie filling stand out from the pack. By using tapioca starch as a thickener, versus flour as in the original vintage recipe, or cornstarch, the fresh cherry flavor bursts through the filling instead of being overpowered resulting in a clear and bright look and taste versus lackluster. What’s not to love?

Ingredients

  • For the Cherry Pie Filling
  • 5 to 6 cups (1135 to 1362 grams) fresh pitted tart cherries, about 2½ to 3 pounds
  • 1 to 1¼ cups (200 to 250 grams) granulated organic cane sugar
  • 4 tablespoons (30 grams) tapioca flour/starch, such as Bob’s Red Mill®
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • ½ cup (about 120 ml) organic tart cherry juice, not from concentrate
  • ¼ to ½ teaspoon pure almond extract
  • Special Equipment
  • Cherry Pitter, such as Progressive International GPC-5000 Cherry-It Multiple Cherry Pitter

Preparation

In a large saucepan, blend together sugar, tapioca flour/starch and salt using a whisk. Add cherry juice and stir until well blended; add pitted cherries. Cook and stir over medium heat until mixture reaches a boil, about 2 to 3 minutes.

Remove from heat and stir in almond extract. Set aside to cool to room temperature. Use as a filling or topping immediately in recipes or store in jars with tight lids in refrigerator up to 2 days.

Notes

Tips:

If storing pie filling in the refrigerator, it may separate. To thicken again, reheat filling in a saucepan over medium heat stirring frequently. Cool before using in recipes.

When we made this recipe, we made two batches yielding 5 pints or 5 half liter jars full.

Recipe Source: WickedGoodKitchen.com

http://wickedgoodkitchen.com/moms-homemade-tart-cherry-pie-filling/

Visual Step-by-Step for Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling

Including Recommended Brands

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 23

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 33

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 16

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 17

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 18

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 19

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 20

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 21

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 22

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 24

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 25

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 26

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 27

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 28

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 29

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 30

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 31

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 32

Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling 4

 

Comments

  1. Your cherries you picked look so pretty and fresh, I’m swooning at them! I think I would end up just eating the pie filling right out of the jar, YUM!
    Pamela @ Brooklyn Farm Girl recently posted…Creamy Chocolate Nutella Fudgsicle PopsicleMy Profile

    • Thank you, Pamela! Yes, this recipe makes enough for a pie…and, enough to snack on with a spoon! Of course, I designed it that way. Mwa-hahahaha!

  2. Lovely photos of tart cherries and jars filled with cherry preserves! Reminds me of my childhood. And, coincidentally, right this moment I am enjoying a tart cherry pie made from frozen sour cherries!
    Julia | JuliasAlbum.com recently posted…Mixed berry yogurt muffinsMy Profile

  3. Wow, the cherries look so fresh, you would have been in heaven. This does look like so much fun. I could use this on icecream any day. The pitter is too cute, have to find something like that, where can I find something like that?

    • Thank you, Asha! Yes, it was fun playing with fresh tart cherries in the kitchen. Can’t wait to share what else I’ve been up to with cherries. As for the nifty cherry pitter, I provided two (2) links within the post to Amazon.com for it…once within the article (follow the “gizmo” link) and once within the ingredients section of the recipe under “Special Equipment”. You’ll love that little guy! It’s so much fun to use. Thanks again for stopping by!

  4. I’m thinking you worked your little cherry off on this post – WOW! Great stuff. Your photos and narrative transfixed me. I’ve never made a cherry pie – maybe this is the summer for me to change that!! Awesome job, Stacy!
    Dan from Platter Talk recently posted…Bacon-Gorgonzola SlidersMy Profile

    • Hahaha! Yes, I really DID work my little cherry off on this post! Thank you, Dan. You are such a sweetheart. And, I hope you really will bake a cherry pie or some cherry hand pies this summer. Thank you for stopping by and brightening my day! xo

  5. Stacy I absoutely love the entire cherry blog post! The photos are beautiful and can not wait to make a batch of Cherry Pie Filling. I am thinking, cherry pie, cherry hand pies, cherry tarts, cherry cobbler or just enjoying a great big Texas-size spoon full!! You worked hard to make this post perfect…and it is! xo

    • Thank you, Ronda! Well, now you know what I’ve been up to. Up to my eyeballs in tart cherry everything, hahaha! Thank you so much for stopping by and brightening my day, m’lady! xo

  6. Thanks for the recipe and hope you are having a fabulous week

  7. This cherry pie filling looks so good Stacy! It’s picture perfect with all the plump cherries you picked:) Love your cherry pitter too, it looks so fun!

  8. Not only am I drooling over this pie filling, but that cherry pitter!!! OOOOOOH!
    Jen @JuanitasCocina recently posted…Lightened-Up Sesame Chicken ~ Buffet NOT Included…My Profile

    • Thank you, Jen! That little cherry pitter is a little wonder. It works miracles in the kitchen during cherry season!

  9. Gorgeous photos!
    I have never been a big fan of cherries – but your pictures just might convert me! The pie filling sounds delectable…ugh…now am so hungry…for pie!!!! :)
    Great post!
    Shashi @ http://runninsrilankan.com recently posted…Superfoods Acai Blueberry Muffins!My Profile

    • Thank you, Shashi! I appreciate your compliments on the photos. And, I hope you will become a tart cherry convert. The cherries may be tart, but the rest of the filling balances everything out. Tart Cherry Pie is the best! :)

  10. My mom flys in today and cherry pie is first on our list! That is also quite the pitter, never seen one like that!
    Cathy Pollak ~ Noble Pig recently posted…Individual No-Bake Banana Split “Cakes”My Profile

    • Thank you, Cathy! Have fun baking cherry pies with mom! That little pitter is just the best. You will cherish it in your kitchen if you work with cherries often!

  11. I’ve canned cherries, but they are always BING (more purple red). Have never added a thickener though. YUMMY!
    Sandy @ RE recently posted…Cambozola Cheese and Crackers RecipeMy Profile

    • Thank you, Sandy! Oh, I am sure you canned those pretty Bings being up there in the Pacific Northwest! Aren’t cherries the best? Hubby and I have such fond childhood memories of tart Michigan Montmorency cherries in the summertime as well as The Cherry Festival up in Traverse City, Michigan. Thanks for stopping by, girl! xo

  12. I adore looking through my grandmother’s old recipe box. So many “family” recipes were clipped from newspapers and magazines! :) I even found some old coupons in there.

    This pie filling looks magnificent! :)
    Jennifer @ Not Your Momma’s Cookie recently posted…My Favorite ThingsMy Profile

    • Thank you, Jennifer! My grandmother held onto her “ladies magazines” (as she called them) and I was fascinated by how many recipes were shared within those publications. She had a recipe box jam-packed with handwritten recipes and newspaper clippings, too. So much fun to sift through them! Thank you for sharing and for the compliments!

  13. This is a great looking recipe, Stacy. The photos you have taken are really good too. I am all of a sudden in the mood for cherry pie that’s for sure! Thanks for sharing this with us.
    Wes @ Black Cherry Juice recently posted…Black cherry juice: Nothing is more delicious than thisMy Profile

    • Thank you, Wes! I appreciate the compliments on the photos as I am a total photography novice. And, I simply must check out your Black Cherry Juice website! Thanks for stopping by!

  14. I am wondering if you can use a scanner and make multiple batches of this to can and put up for winter. Have you tried this?

    • Hi there, Alicia! If you mean “canner”, to preserve tart cherries as a pie filling, the most reliable recipe I have found is in the Ball® Complete Book of Home Preserving on page 174. Their recipe for Tart Cherry Pie Filling calls for 10 pounds of frozen tart cherries, 3 1/2 cups granulated sugar, 1 cup of ClearJel®, 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon and 1/4 cup lemon juice. The recipe also uses fresh cherry juice from the thawed cherries. Just make sure you bring the cherries and juice to a full boil. I have not tried it, but I would think you could use fresh cherries, but you may need to add cherry juice (not from concentrate) in your recipe if you do not get enough from the fresh cherries. Here is a helpful link on processing cherries from Utah State University found at a fellow food blogger’s site: http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/publication/FN_2005_Harvest-03.pdf I hope this information helps. Good luck and happy canning!

  15. do give it a try, we are sure you would love matar paneer… cherry pie filling is so quick to make and looks unbelievably gorgeous in those masons, its tempting us to try our hands on it soon :-)
    hope to see you again in our blog
    HAVE A GREAT DAY!!!
    Kumar’s Kitchen recently posted…Home- Style Matar Paneer For Brightening Up A Cloudy DayMy Profile

  16. This looks like delicious cherry pie filling!!!
    Ashley @ Wishes and Dishes recently posted…Mango, Pineapple & Cranberry SalsaMy Profile

  17. We want a cherry tree!!!! Don’t think it will survive in miami’s crazy weather though!!! This reminded us of the first time we saw a cherry tree in Florence… Needless to say we stole some cherries.. lol
    Mr. & Mrs. P recently posted…Peach and Raspberry PieMy Profile

    • Hahaha! Guess what I have been pining for? My own cherry tree! Honest to goodness, I have been yammering on about it to The Big Lug. Non-stop, LOL! It does take 4 to 5 years before a cherry tree will bear fruit. So, you had better plant one soon! Thanks for stopping by, you two! xo

  18. Cherry heaven! I can only imagine how good this pie filling is! All I would need is a spoon :)
    Meghan recently posted…Kahlua Cookies and Cream Ice CreamMy Profile

  19. terrycadymt says:

    Hi Stacy,

    Last year I discovered the joy of sour cherry jam! Do you think this is thick enough for jam? Or maybe add a little more tapioca? I hate jams where all you can taste is sugar, and the commercial brand I found is perfect, but very expensive. The sour cherries are also incredible dried – the drying process concentrates the sugar in them, but still gives you a nice little bit of tartness.

    • Hi there, Terry! Oh, yes…I just adore dried cherries, too! Even chocolate-covered dried cherries. I am from Michigan and tart cherries in all sorts of ways are a staple in the diet. ;) This is definitely a pie filling and not a jam. For jam, you may not even need as much thickening (tapioca) because the sugars are going to cook down and do the work. You want a natural concentrated cherry juice and sugar combination, that comes naturally in the recipe, for jam. The pie filling as a delightful gooey-richness to it that was specifically designed for tart cherry pie. I would go with a jam recipe and only sweeten it to your liking. Then, cook it down to your desired thickness knowing that it will become thicker upon cooling. This, of course, would be for a refrigerator jam to be consumed within a week or two. If you wish to preserve for longer term storage, you will need to follow a recipe for jam to preserve. Thanks so much for stopping by and happy sour cherry jamming!

  20. Deeeeelicious cherries. I love this idea!
    Trisha recently posted…Rosemary and Sea Salt CrackersMy Profile

  21. This is so fabulous!!

  22. Oh my garsh!!! I love this a million times over girl! I’ve always wanted to try and make my own cherry filling.
    Megan {Country Cleaver} recently posted…Nutella Cocoa Krispie TreatsMy Profile

    • Girly, you will luuurve it! You and Ben…go tart cherry picking. Together. Soon. Find an orchard. Then, make some tart cherry pie, slab pie, crumble bars and eat yourselves silly! Seriously…thank you so much for stopping by, Megan! xo

  23. I am obsessed looking at these gorgeous pictures! So so pretty! What is it about cherries? They are so photogenic. Pinned! xoxo- K
    Katrina @ In Katrina’s Kitchen recently posted…Brown Sugar Ice CreamMy Profile

  24. I’m extremely jealous that you have a six-pitter cherry pitter. I have a one-pitter, and it takes me forever! I love cherries, but the pitting keeps me away. I’m on a mission to find this here contraption. Seriously, Stacy, this recipe is genius. I love that it uses all cherries and no water. I bet this is one flavorful filling. Your photos are gorgeous; I just want to reach through the screen and pluck a cherry off of the tree.
    Jennie @themessybakerblog recently posted…Healthier Choco Chip CookiesMy Profile

    • Thank you, Jennie! You will LOVE this little inexpensive pitter. (It’s a four-pitter, just to let you know.) It is the best! I found it at Amazon.com. It is extremely efficient and very nifty-neat. No “bloody murder scene” to clean up following pitting! Thanks again for dropping by and for the Twitter shout out. I truly appreciate your support, girl! xo

  25. That pitter?! Oh my heavens! I need that in my life. But I especially need this pie filling. Love all that sweet and tangy fresh fruit flavor. And your photos ROCK!
    Kelly Senyei | Just a Taste recently posted…Pineapple Chicken Fried RiceMy Profile

    • Thank you, Kelly! I appreciate the compliments–especially on the photography as I’m such a novice. And, yes…that little pitter is a life saver during peak cherry season. You will love it! Thanks for stopping by, my friend. You always make my day! xo

  26. I love baking with fresh sour cherries. I haven’t made a pie yet but know it would be so much better with this rather than canned filling. Six cups of cherries is the perfect amount of filling!
    Laura Dembowski recently posted…Roasted Strawberry Baked Oatmeal + GiveawayMy Profile

    • Thank you, Laura! The recipe is infinitely tastier than canned cherry pie filling and so easy, too. Enjoy and happy baking!

  27. Love the bright color!

  28. Thanks for sharing this canning recipe and boy does those cherries look amazing! That pitter is pretty nifty too.
    Sakura recently posted…Taco SeasoningMy Profile

  29. wondering if I can put this in canning jars hot and seal them as regular canning ? store them on my canning shelf in the basement without refrigeration? my daughter in law just bought a farm and has a cherry terry there . Thought this would be good way to can for the winter.

    • Hi there, Kim! Thank you for writing. To answer your question… You would need to follow proper canning procedures and use a pectin, such as ClearJel®. This recipe was specifically designed to be used immediately or within a couple of days. And, it requires refrigeration. Storing otherwise, or for longer periods, is most definitely NOT food safe. The recipe I recommend is called Tart Cherry Pie Filling and can be found on page 174 in the Ball® Complete Book of Home Preserving. Once again, thank you for writing. And, happy canning!

  30. Kathlene Bradford-Marks says:

    Love the website and the recipe! Very familiar. :o ) I grew up in Traverse City, Michigan…the Cherry Capitol of the World (so they say!). To keep your cherries from darkening while you are pitting them or while you are “juicing” them, simply stir in 3 tsp. of Real Lemon juice. It will keep them from turning colors.

    :o )

    • Thank you for writing, Kathlene! And, I appreciate your tip with the lemon juice. I didn’t add any fresh lemon juice (as I do with apples) because I didn’t want to add more tartness and planned on using them immediately. However, I bet that small amount wouldn’t matter during the juicing. Thank you for the tip! I will update my post to reflect it in the tips section. Once again, thanks for stopping by!

  31. Hello! I was wondering if this recipe freezes well? I’d really like to make a double batch and freeze half for future use. It looks so yummy!!!

    • Hi there, Angi! Thank you for writing. To answer your question…this recipe was developed to be used right away, like within a week. I have not yet created a canning recipe for my Mom’s Tart Cherry Pie Filling. However, when I do, I will use the guidelines for a universal pectin such as Pomona’s Universal Pectin and pattern my recipe by this one at their site: Apple Pie Filling. I’m sorry that I have not gotten to that point yet. But, perhaps you can find some helpful information at their FAQ page at the Pomona’s Universal Pectin website. One important note…Pomona’s Universal Pectin can be used to make freezer jam. So, it would seem very possible to create a frozen tart cherry pie filling. Again, I would have to develop a recipe and thoroughly test it to be sure. Thanks again for stopping by and happy canning!

  32. Hi Stacy!! I just went to start making this pie with some fresh cherries we got from my inlaws and I realized I dont have cherry juice. Is there any substitutions I could use or can I collect it from my cherries??

    • Hi there, Nikki! I’m sorry I was away from my laptop today. (It is Sunday.) Yes…you can definitely collect the juices from your cherries. As they sit, they will provide juices. Add about two teaspoons fresh lemon juice to prevent your cherries from turning brown. Be sure to collect enough juices to go with the amount of thickener and you will be fine. I hope your day of baking went well!

  33. Is this also able to be “canned” for pantry storage…or only a cold storage? It just looks sooo good and my son is a Marine and I would love to send him and his wife a jar.

    • Hi there, Angela! Thank you for writing. To answer your question…this recipe was developed to be used right away, like within a week, and requires refrigeration. Storing any other way is not food safe. I have not yet created a canning recipe for my Mom’s Tart Cherry Pie Filling. However, when I do, I will use the guidelines for a universal pectin such as Pomona’s Universal Pectin and pattern my recipe by this one at their site: Apple Pie Filling. I’m sorry that I have not gotten to that point yet. But, I look forward to it next cherry season. Perhaps you can find some helpful information at their FAQ page at the Pomona’s Universal Pectin website. Until I develop a recipe, you would need to follow proper canning procedures and use a pectin, such as ClearJel®. The recipe I recommend is called Tart Cherry Pie Filling and can be found on page 174 in the Ball® Complete Book of Home Preserving. Once again, thank you for writing. And, happy canning!

  34. This looks so yummy.
    Angela b recently posted…Country Themed Tractor Diaper Cake DisplayMy Profile

  35. Linda West says:

    These are some of the most beautiful photos for the tutorials! I love cerries and cannot wait to bake these bars and make the pie filling! Will definitely follow you on Pinterest!! Thanks

    • Thank you, Linda! And, thank you for the follow at Pinterest! I hope you enjoy both recipes and make the tart cherry pie filling and the bars. They’re sooooo good! Thank you for stopping by and have a lovely week!

  36. Hi, I haven’t been able to find fresh cherries in my area. Is it possible to make this recipe using frozen cherries? I would love to make this for Thanksgiving tomorrow!

    • Hi there, Kimberley! Thank you for writing. To answer your question, I must be honest and say that I have not tested this pie filling recipe with frozen tart cherries. However, you can certainly make pie fillings from frozen berries and cherries. Since you may have a bit more liquid by using frozen tart cherries, you may wish to add a little more thickener to thicken all the juices. Or, you could simply thaw the cherries and see how much juice they provide when placed into a colander over a bowl to catch the juices. Simply measure how much juice you have. Then, if you have 1/2 cup, use this amount of juice captured from the frozen cherries in the recipe in place of the 1/2 cup cherry juice I call for in the recipe along with the amount of sugar and thickener called for. Use any remaining cherry juice for another recipe or to drink. :) Be sure to purchase frozen tart cherries with no sugar added and you should be good to go. I hope that I have answered your question thoroughly and completely. Happy cherry pie baking and best wishes for a happy Thanksgiving!

Trackbacks

  1. […] Homemade Tart Cherry Pie Filling {gluten free} by Wicked Good Kitchen […]

Speak Your Mind

*

CommentLuv badge