Apple Cider & Citrus Turkey Brine with Herbs

Follow Me on Pinterest

Never (ever) worry again about serving a dried-out and tasteless turkey for the holidays. Experienced home cooks as well as professional chefs rely on old-fashioned brining techniques to assure a moist, succulent, flavorful roasted turkey. Brining is easy once you nail down the basics. And we, at Wicked Good Kitchen, believe our recipe stands at the very top amongst other turkey brine recipes.

Why is our recipe for turkey brine wicked good?

Well, to begin with, the kitchen aromatics alone will make you feel as though you are soon to be dining with royalty at The King’s Table! However, it is the fact that our recipe combines the best of both worlds in the way of taste sensations by combining both apple cider and citrus juices—to include the essential oils from the rinds—making our recipe a true standout.

In addition, our brine is seasoned to perfection with the finest in fresh herbs and fragrant spices to include garlic, rosemary, sage and thyme as well as whole star anise, cinnamon and allspice and juniper berries. Furthermore, our brine consists of equal parts apple cider (not just a few cups like most recipes) and water assuring a deep, flavorful roasted turkey. Finally, we call for just enough salt to ensure a juicy turkey—without giving it an overly salty taste—by drawing moisture into the meat keeping it tender and juicy as it roasts. Your family and friends will give rave reviews and pronounce you a rock star chef!

To learn more about brining your holiday turkey, please see our Turkey Brining 101 Tutorial, below the recipe, complete with step-by-step instructions.

Apple Cider & Citrus Turkey Brine with Herbs

Yield: Makes enough brine for a 16 to 20-pound fresh turkey.

Apple Cider & Citrus Turkey Brine with Herbs

Ingredients

  • 1 (16 to 20-pound) fresh turkey, rinsed & patted dry, with neck & giblets reserved for stock
  • For the Apple Cider, Herb & Spice Infusion
  • ¾ to 1 gallon (12 to 16 cups) apple cider
  • 1¼ cups kosher salt
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 6 whole bay leaves
  • 4 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 4 sprigs fresh sage
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 8 whole star anise pods
  • 3 tablespoons whole black peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon allspice berries
  • 1 tablespoon juniper berries
  • 1 or 2 4-inch cinnamon sticks
  • ¾ to 1 gallon (12 to 16 cups) chilled water, preferably distilled
  • For the Citrus & Onion Aromatics
  • 3 medium to large oranges, cut into wedges with rind intact
  • 2 large lemons, cut into wedges with rind intact
  • 2 medium yellow onions, cut into wedges with skin intact
  • Special Equipment
  • 1 12-quart stockpot, with lid
  • 1 large oval enamel roasting pan, without lid
  • 1 large brining bag, such as Williams-Sonoma® brand
  • 1 heavy duty clip (we used Firm Grip® clip from Home Depot) or strong cotton butcher’s twine

Preparation

Prepare the Apple Cider, Herb & Spice Infusion: In a large 12-quart stock pot, bring ¾ gallon (12 cups) apple cider, salt, garlic, herbs and spices to a boil. Stir occasionally to dissolve salt. Remove from heat. Add ¾ gallon (12 cups) chilled water to cool liquid slightly. Meanwhile, reserve ¼ gallon (4 cups) apple cider and ¼ gallon (4 cups) chilled water in refrigerator should it be necessary to cover turkey completely with additional brine in brining bag later. This, of course, depends on the size of your turkey.

Prepare the Brine with Citrus & Onion Aromatics: After the Apple Cider, Herb & Spice Infusion has cooled somewhat (no longer very hot, but still very warm), squeeze citrus wedges into the liquid adding each rind after expelling juices. Next, add onion wedges and stir. Cover stockpot and allow the brine to steep. Cool to room temperature. If preparing brine the day before brining turkey, chill brine in refrigerator until ready to use.

Assemble the Turkey & Brine into Brining Bag: Open zip-top brining bag wide and insert into enamel roasting pan with high sides. Using a large liquid measure (I use my 2-cup glass measure), scoop some of the brine and place it into bottom of large brining bag. Insert the turkey over the brine breast side up. Using a slotted spoon, place some citrus and onion wedges into the cavity of the bird and continue to add the remaining brining liquid over the turkey in the brining bag. Carefully close zip-top and expel as much air as possible. (It helps to have two sets of hands at this point.) Gather top of brining bag and twist. Secure brining bag at the top so that brine covers entire turkey. (We used a Firm Grip clip, but you can use butcher’s twine to tie the bag closed.) If the brine needs more liquid to cover entire turkey, add enough of the remaining ¼ gallon (4 cups) each of the chilled cider and water in equal parts to brining bag before securing closed. (We start by adding 2 cups of each the cider and water and go from there.) Transfer roasting pan, with turkey and brine in brining bag, to refrigerator. Soak turkey for at least 18 hours or up to 2 to 3 days.

Prepare the Turkey for Roasting the Night Before: The night before you plan to roast your turkey, remove it from brining solution; discard brine and brining bag. Pat the bird thoroughly with paper towels to dry completely inside and out.

Note: Now that your turkey has been successfully brined, we recommend that you follow our recipe for Brandy & Tangerine-Glazed Roasted Turkey or your favorite recipe. At this point, our Brandy & Tangerine-Glazed Roasted Turkey recipe will guide you to butter and season your turkey with either butter or Herbed Compound Butter and refrigerate it overnight uncovered in the roasting pan. After refrigerating overnight, and resting for 1 hour at room temperature the next morning, the turkey will be ready to go directly into preheated oven to roast.

Notes

To learn more about brining your holiday turkey, please see our Turkey Brining 101 Tutorial, below, complete with step-by-step instructions.

Recipe Inspiration: Williams-Sonoma's Apple & Spices Turkey Brine Mix.

http://wickedgoodkitchen.com/apple-cider-citrus-turkey-brine-with-herbs/

Step-by-Step: Turkey Brining 101 Tutorial

Mise en Place: Everything in place. Apple cider, kosher salt, minced garlic, bay leaves, fresh rosemary, sage and thyme sprigs, whole star anise pods, whole black peppercorns, whole allspice and juniper berries, cinnamon stick, and wedges of onion, lemon and orange.

In a large 12-quart stock pot, bring ¾ gallon (that’s 12 cups!) apple cider, salt, garlic, herbs and spices to a boil. As you can see, we have already added to the pot the apple cider, salt and minced garlic. Next, we will be adding the herbs and spices. Here, I am adding the whole black peppercorns. You can never have enough black peppercorns, right?

Ahh. Lovely whole black peppercorns bursting with flavor. I am a confessed black peppercorn fiend.

Here I am adding the whole juniper berries which provide a distinct, sharp flavor with citrus notes. Yum! Just perfect for turkey brine.

Next, I am adding whole allspice berries to create a spectacular autumn and winter flavor for our turkey brine.

Here, I am adding the whole star anise pods. Oh, whole star anise pods…how I adore thee. Guys, these babies are essential for an outstanding turkey brine. Trust me. It is just not the same without. You’ll see…I promise!

Next in, bay leaves.

And, cinnamon stick. Just 1 or 2 will do.

Look at our lovely Apple Cider & Citrus Turkey Brine with Herbs and Spices. She’s looking mighty stunning, eh? So far, totally gorg!

Following the spices, we need to add our fresh herb sprigs. Here, I am adding the fresh rosemary and thyme sprigs. Be generous as the herbs will infuse our brine with plenty of flavor.

Next up, fresh sage sprigs. Oh, how I adore the savory flavor of sage–especially when it comes to enjoying roasted turkey and stuffing. The color is pretty, too.

Just simply marvelous! Our Apple Cider & Citrus Turkey Brine with Herbs and Spices is on her way! Um…on her way to Tom Turkey, that is.

Now it is time to give our gorgeous turkey brine a little stir.

I’m telling you, just gorgeous! But, we’re not done yet.

Now we need to allow the brine to come to a boil. See the little bubbles forming already? We need the heat to boiling level so that the herbs and spices will infuse flavor during the steep. Just like when you steep your favorite tea.

Here we are! She’s come to a full boil now.

Next, we need to remove the pot from the heat (I have placed a wire cooling rack under the pot) and add ¾ gallon (12 cups) chilled water. The chilled water will speed up the cooling process and will prepare the brine for the addition of the citrus and onion aromatics. Alternatively, if you are in a hurry, you could use an equivalent amount of ice water with ice cubes. Chef Emeril Lagasse does that. This way, your brine will reach a cooler temperature faster so that you can begin to brine your turkey right away. The brine must be at least room temperature or cooler before brining your turkey. Cooler is best. If you are preparing your turkey brine the day before, which is what I like to do, just chill it in the fridge.

Here, I am adding the ¾ gallon (12 cups) chilled water from a large glass pitcher.

Since all of the water didn’t fit into my large glass pitcher, I am adding the remaining chilled water here from a glass measuring cup.

Next, we move onto the citrus and onion aromatics which will infuse our gorgeous turkey brine even further with flavor.

Before adding each wedge of lemon or orange to the pot, be sure to give it a good squeeze. Release those tasty juices and the essential oils from those rinds, people! It is that important. These steps are why our turkey brine recipe is so exceptional and fit for brined roasted turkeys on “The King’s Table”.

Keep going…keep squeezing and adding those citrus wedges. It will all be worth it. Trust me.

Next, add the onion wedges. As you can see, I have done that here.

Seriously. I wish there was smell-o-vision. Your house is going to smell heavenly from these kitchen aromatics!

Just stunningly beautiful! Sexy brine.

Now, time for the cooling and steeping process. Place the lid atop your stock pot and allow the brine to cool and steep. Just think of all that flavor infusion going on!

You are going to need these: Bringing Bags. For our 18-pound Tom Turkey, we will be using the largest bag. These quality Brining Bags are from Williams-Sonoma. We have received no compensation from W-S. We just dig their heavy duty brining bags.

You will also need a large roasting pan. We find that our inexpensive oval enamelware roasting pan is ideal for the turkey brining process. It has nice, high sides (to keep our turkey covered and saturated in brine), handy handles and it easily slides onto a shelf in the fridge. Don’t forget to clear some space! If you need to, remove one of your drawers–like the deli meats drawer. This way, your roasting pan with turkey inside will have adequate clearance. Now, we are ready to prepare our brining bag. Assemble the Turkey & Brine into Brining Bag: Open zip-top brining bag wide and insert into enamel roasting pan with high sides. Done. Check.

In addition to brining bags and a large oval enamel roasting pan, you will need a large slotted spoon and liquid measuring cup. Since most kitchens are equipped with these implements, we did not add them to our recipe ingredients list under special equipment.

Now we are ready to prepare our brining bag for Tom Turkey. Continuing… Assemble the Turkey & Brine into Brining Bag: Using a large liquid measure (I use my 2-cup glass measure), scoop some of the brine and place it into bottom of large brining bag. Once again, I like to use my large slotted spoon to scoop up the citrus and onion wedges. As you can see, I placed some into the bottom of the brining bag. Now the brining bag is ready for Tom Turkey.

As you can see, we have added Tom Turkey to the brining bag. Next, using a slotted spoon, scoop up the aromatic solids (the citrus and onion wedges as well as some of the herbs and spices) and place over and around the turkey.

Don’t forget to place some of the aromatic solids into the large cavity of your turkey. This is essential.

Next, continue to add the remaining brining liquid over the turkey in the brining bag.

Tom looks divine surrounded by all that brining goodness.

Now, step back and marvel at your cheffy self. Look at what you have accomplished. And, it was so easy. But, just wait until you smell this phenomenally brined roasted turkey as it is roasting! Your holiday dinner guests will think you are a rock star chef. Yeah.

Next, it is time to enclose Tom Turkey and get him in the fridge. First, we have to expel as much air as possible whilst closing the zip-top brining bag. This is where two (2) sets of hands come in especially handy. Gather and twist tightly the top of the bag. Important: If the brine needs more liquid to cover entire turkey, add enough of the remaining ¼ gallon (4 cups) each of the chilled cider and water in equal parts to brining bag before securing closed.

Once you have gathered and twisted the top of the brining bag, it is time to tightly clip it closed. This is important so that the brining liquid surrounds the turkey entirely. We do not use the small bag clips that come with the brining bags. Instead, we use a heavy duty clip. As mentioned in the recipe under special equipment, we like to use a Firm Grip® clip from Home Depot. But, you could use a strong cotton butcher’s twine as well.

Voila! You have now successfully brined your turkey for the upcoming holiday. Pat yourself on the back. Swell job!

Comments

  1. I had never brined a turkey before and I found this recipe and it was fantastic, it kept the meat tender and just a hint of all those lovely flavours really came into their own when serving the cold leftovers – YUM. I will definitely do this again. :)

    • Thank you, Jules! I’m so glad you enjoyed using our turkey brine and that your turkey turned out tender, juicy and tasty. I appreciate that you took the time to drop by providing positive feedback for me and my readers. Best wishes to you and yours for a Happy Holiday Season and New Year!

  2. perla jaurez says:

    I really want to try this brine this year in the paragraph there is mentioned of Brandy & Tangerine-Glazed Roasted Turkey to try with the brine. do you have the recipe that i can print. I have been looking all over the internet with no luck. thanks

    • Hi there, Perla! The recipe for Brandy & Tangerine-Glazed Roasted Turkey is one that I am currently finishing work on. I have been out sick for the past several months but hope to return to blogging soon. (Right now, I am aiming for next week. Hopefully, the Monday before Thanksgiving.) I wish the recipe could have been posted sooner for you! If you would like, I can send you an email with a link to the recipe when the post goes live. Once again, thank you for writing. Meanwhile, I wish you and yours a very happy and meaningful Thanksgiving Day!

      • Stacy…this sounds divine! I am going to try it, could you send me the glaze too. I would appreciate it very much, and thank you for sharing this beautiful recipe! Happy Thanksgiving!!!

        danamsmith57@suddenlink.net

        • Hi there, Dana! Thank you for writing and for the compliments. My pleasure in sharing this fabulous Thanksgiving recipe with you. You’re gonna love it!

          OK, here is my recipe for Apple Cider, Brandy & Tangerine Glaze (enough for a 16- to 18-pound turkey): 1 cup tangerine marmalade (I like to use Stonewall Kitchen brand), 1 cup Grand Marnier® (orange brandy) or your favorite brandy or Cognac, 5 tablespoons fresh apple cider, 2 tablespoons raw organic apple cider vinegar, such as Bragg® brand, 1 teaspoon kosher salt (if you use regular table salt only use 1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon or it will be too salty) and 2 tablespoons unsalted butter.

          In a small saucepan, combine marmalade, brandy, apple cider, cider vinegar and salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer uncovered until thickened to syrup consistency and reduced to 1 1/2 cups, about 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in butter. Set aside to cool completely before using.

          To use the glaze when roasting turkey, simply brush half of the glaze (3/4 cup) over the uncovered turkey (remove any foil first) just before the last hour to hour and a half of roasting time (by weight of your turkey). Once your turkey has finished roasting, and the juices run clear, remove from oven. Immediately, brush the remaining glaze (3/4 cup) over turkey. Allow the turkey to rest before carving and serving.

          Here is a look at the ingredients and this is what your Apple Cider, Brandy & Tangerine Glaze will look like. Here is a sneak peek of what my Brandy & Tangerine-Glazed Roasted Turkey looks like.

          Meanwhile, I hope to get this recipe published here on the blog sometime on Monday. At least you now have the recipe and know what ingredients to shop for. Enjoy!

          Once again, thank you for writing. And, thank you kindly for the warm Thanksgiving wishes. Best wishes to you and your family for a happy and meaningful Thanksgiving Day celebration! :)

  3. Does it matter what recipe you use to cook turkey after brining it? Would the flavors interfere?

    • Hi there, Danielle! Thank you for writing. To answer your question, the flavors in this brine are pretty universal and will complement most roasted turkey recipes. Thanks again for stopping by and…Happy Thanksgiving! :)

  4. Hello, I can’t find your recipe for Brandy & Tangerine-Glazed Roasted Turkey. Do you have it posted? I would love to use it this year. Thanks!

    • Hi there, Tammy! The recipe for Brandy & Tangerine-Glazed Roasted Turkey is one that I am currently finishing work on. I have been out sick for the past several months but hope to return to blogging soon. (Right now, I am aiming for next week. Hopefully, the Monday before Thanksgiving.) I wish the recipe could have been posted sooner for you! If you would like, I can send you an email with a link to the recipe when the post goes live. Once again, thank you for writing. Meanwhile, I wish you and yours a very happy and meaningful Thanksgiving Day! :)

  5. I’d love to try this, however, I’m not making a bird near this big this near. We are doing a very small Thanksgiving meal this year. I will only be making a 7 pound turkey breast (bone in/rib meat), but would still like to try this. How can I do this?

    • Hi there, Kristin! Thank you for writing. To answer your question, the best thing would be to cut our brine recipe exactly in half. The reason why you shouldn’t cut the recipe down further is because you definitely want to make sure you have enough brine to cover the entire turkey breast. If you have any leftover brine, you can simply discard it. If you fall just a tad short, just add a little more cold water or chilled apple cider to cover the turkey breast. It is always best to be safe than sorry. :) I did a quick search for you and the fine folks at Weber have shared a recipe for brining turkey breast here for a 5- to 6-pound turkey breast which is very close to your turkey breast’s weight. You will notice (just as I readily did) that their 2/3 cup of kosher salt called for in their recipe is pretty close to half the amount of 1 1/4 cups kosher salt called for in our brine recipe which would be just under 2/3 cup. You will also notice that much of the water liquid called for in the Weber recipe is made up of ice cubes (which will melt) versus water and cider in our recipe. I am confident your turkey breast will turn out lovely — juicy, tender and flavorful! Thanks again for writing, Kristin. I hope that I have answered your question thoroughly and completely. Meanwhile, best wishes to you and your family for a happy and meaningful Thanksgiving Day and holiday weekend!

Trackbacks

  1. [...] every Thanksgiving holiday in savory applications to make yet other special “brews” such as my Apple Cider and Citrus Turkey Brine with Herbs & Spices and Golden Tangerine Turkey Giblet [...]

Speak Your Mind

*

CommentLuv badge